“Put A Ring On It” Is Not An Anti-Poverty Program

Conservatives say marriage is the “ultimate anti-poverty program,” and claim that most of our economic woes would vanish if more people got hitched. A new study suggests "putting a ring on it" barely makes a dent in poverty.
Terrance Heath
  • 31

The Fed Finds an America Deeply Divided

The "average" U.S. family is doing just fine, says the Federal Reserve's latest portrait of household wealth. But typical Americans, other numbers in the report make clear, are struggling something awful. What's up here?

Beyond Ferguson: Sanders To Propose Youth Jobs Bill

At Michael Brown’s funeral, Rev. Al Sharpton lamented that America has “money to give military equipment to police forces,” but not to train and employ young people. Sen. Bernie Sanders is making good on a promise to remedy that.
Terrance Heath
  • 31

Fast Food Strikes Are Back, Bigger Than Ever

Today, workers in 150 cities will take to the streets to demand livable wages for themselves and their families, the right to organize, and a better economy for all of us.
Terrance Heath
  • 28

Labor Day Victories to Celebrate

In recent decades the news for the country’s workers and the labor movement has been mostly bad. It would be easy to go on about how bad things are, but it is worth highlighting a couple of good news items against this backdrop.
Dean Baker
  • 6

Wages Dropped for Almost All American Workers in First Half of 2014

Think your money's not going very far this year? It's not your imagination. According to new research, real hourly wages declined for almost everybody in the U.S. workforce in the first half of 2014. Thanks, so-called recovery.
Lynne Stuart Parramore
  • 56

Looks Like Burger King’s Subjects Are Royally Pissed Off

Tolstoy wrote that "kings are the slaves of history." Unfortunately for Burger King, which intends to renounce its American status for tax purposes, neither history nor public opinion is on its side.
Richard Eskow
  • 44

A Stock-Market Milestone is Reached, But Who Cares?

Monday morning the S&P 500 composite index briefly passed the 2,000 mark. But out beyond Washington and Wall Street and the Hamptons, out in the world where most Americans live, things aren’t quite as rosy.
Richard Eskow
  • 21

Public Pressure Can Influence The Federal Reserve

The structure of the Federal Reserve ensures that the banking industry's concerns get a full hearing at Fed meetings, while those of workers may not. But that doesn't mean protests against Fed policies are futile.
Dean Baker
  • 9

Solar Power Gets Hot, Hot, Hot

With so many homeowners and businesses making greener energy choices, private utilities see the writing on the wall. They're trying to coax lawmakers into rigging the rules against increasingly competitive new energy alternatives.

The Class War Goes Retail

Why does Wall Street tank on news portending economic gains for most Americans? Don’t people with extra money boost the economy when they spend more freely? Isn’t it something worth celebrating? Not in an economy that caters to the rich.

Tom Friedman, Globalization’s Man in Madagascar

Thomas Friedman recently filed an editorial from, and about, Madagascar. In a new piece for Salon, we point out the flaws in his thinking – flaws that mirror his shortsighted […]
Richard Eskow
  • 9

Who Really Rates as a ‘True Egalitarian’?

A leading conservative academic is charging that critics of America's top-heavy distribution of income and wealth are missing the bigger picture. In the process, progressive economists point out, he's only fogging that picture up.

Astoundingly Legal Corporate Tax Thievery

If you get a speeding ticket, do you get to deduct the fine from the income tax you owe? Then why should JPMorgan Chase be able to deduct from its taxes a $20 billion fine for wrongdoing as a cost of doing business?
Jim Hightower
  • 29

The Rise of the Bankster Landlord

One of the most startling trends to come out of the wreckage of the 2007-2008 financial crisis is the explosion of Wall Street firms buying up and renting out property all across the country. This is insane -- it’s a recipe for disaster.

What I Learned From My Minimum Wage Job

Sen. Rand Paul mocked the Obamas for wanting their daughters to experience working for minimum wage. My experience taught me “the value of work,” and to value workers for whom earning a living isn’t always fun, stimulating, or fair.
Terrance Heath
  • 15

GOP Plays “Snake Line” Politics With The Child Tax Credit

As is usually the case with the conservative extremists who dominate the House, when it says it is about to "improve" something, that's the signal that for a lot of struggling families, things are actually about to get worse.
Isaiah J. Poole
  • 30

Shiftless Corporations Renounce America

Corporations that “invert” park their assets, staff and sales in the U.S. But with their sham overseas addresses, they won’t pay taxes on foreign income to the country that protects them.
Leo Gerard
  • 19

Arrested for Being Too Poor To Afford Child Care

There's no margin of error for low-income working parents. There's no “plan B,” because there's barely enough resources for “plan A.” If just one thing goes wrong, “plan A” crashes and burns, taking the rest of someone’s life with it.
Terrance Heath
  • 19

The Emerging Democratic Debate

Democrats, we're told, are united whereas Republicans are tearing each other apart. But beneath the apparent consensus, a fundamental argument is brewing between the Wall Street and the Warren wing of the party.
Robert Borosage
  • 72

The Crash of 2016 Gets Closer Every Day

Until the corporate elite and our billionaire class are under control, and our working class once again can enter the middle class, we stand at the precipice of a great crash. Without vigorous governmental action, it gets closer every day.
1 2 3 21