Wait, the Trump Campaign Didn’t Have Small Biz Advisers Until This Week?

Steve Rouzer

Just three weeks before the election, the Trump Campaign forms a Small Business Advisory Council.

On Sunday, a mere three weeks ahead of the November election, the Trump Campaign announced it’s formation of a small business advisory council tasked with providing advice on the issues and solutions most important to small businesses.

“I think it’s great that Mr. Trump is interested in hearing from small business owners, but it’s unfortunate that he is reaching out to us now, just weeks before the election,” said ReShonda Young, the owner of Popcorn Heaven in Waterloo and Main Street Alliance Executive Committee Member. “We would have loved to help ensure his tax policy wasn’t just another giveaway to large corporations and the rich, and we would have put our foot down on his immigration stance. Instead, we have more of the same on taxes and an immigration policy that tears apart our communities and threatens our businesses.”

Mr. Trump has boasted his wealth and business acumen since entering the race last year, but he has lacked coherence on policy aimed to help small businesses. His small business tax cut was on the table, then off the table, and his immigration policy lacks even the most basic understanding of what fuels and drives our local economies.

“To the Trump Campaign, this council’s formation was probably better late than never, but to me, to real small business owners on Main Street, it shows the utter disregard he has had for us throughout his campaign and career,” said Paul Heroux, a retired painter in Orlando, Florida and Main Street Alliance National Action Committee Member. “Donald Trump made a business of screwing over small business owners, like The Paint Shop, in Doral, Florida”

Economy-boosting investments have largely been missing from Donald Trump’s policy platform, a shining example of why he should have put an advisory council together months ago. The tax breaks and regulatory lifts that motivate large corporations don’t work for Main Street. A 2015 report from Main Street Alliance, “Voices of Main Street” surveyed over 1100 business owners on the issues impacting their businesses. More than half of respondents noted customer acquisition as their most significant concern, more than double those concerned with taxes and four times the respondents that answered ‘regulations.’

“The Trump Campaign’s formation of a small business advisory council at this point in his campaign is hardly a gesture of good faith. The reality is that Mr. Trump thinks he is a business genius and that he can speak for us,” said Chris Petersen, independent family farmer and Main Street Alliance of Iowa member. “What he hasn’t realized is that the way we do business on Main Street couldn’t be further from his cut-and-run business tactics. He has a lot to learn over the next three weeks.”

Despite his big business experience, Donald Trump is out of touch with the needs of Main Street. If he prioritized small business success, he would have built our issues into his platform months ago. Instead, he offers the empty gesture of forming a small business council weeks before the election.

“I’m honestly shocked that the Trump Campaign just thought of forming a small business council, his opponent has had one for months,” said Megan Baker, co-owner of Orange Blossom Jamboree in Brooksville, Florida, and Main Street Alliance of Florida member. “Forming the council now seems more like an empty gesture than a real focus on the issues important to us. His policies are already written. His tax policy skews towards large corporations and the rich, his immigration policy is a mass deportation of members of my customer base and his position on raising the federal minimum wage won’t put more money in consumer’s pockets.”

Steven Rouzer is the Communications Manager for the Main Street Alliance

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