Progressive Breakfast for February 8

Morning Message

Inequality Against Democracy: 10 Facts About the 1 Percent

We are living through the greatest “wealth grab” in history. But inequality is not produced by immutable forces. It’s the result of a legislative agenda promoted by the rich and executed by their political allies. The struggle to change this agenda and end inequality is inseparable from the other critical struggles of our time. What follows are 10 facts about the 1 percent – but they’re not just statistics. They’re a paint-by-numbers picture of an economy, and a democracy, in urgent need of change.

NH Gets Heated For Dems

Sanders defines his agenda as mainstream. W. Post quotes: “It is not a radical idea to say that public education should go through college … We can afford these programs because we’re going to transfer some of that wealth back.”

Democratic insiders says Sanders winning the economic argument, reports Politico: “Among Democratic insiders surveyed this week in the early states, 60 percent said Sanders winning the economic argument – an assessment with which more than three-quarters of Republicans agreed.”

Bill Clinton attacks Bernie Sanders. NYT: “Bill Clinton uncorked an extended attack on SenatorBernie Sanders on Sunday, harshly criticizing Mr. Sanders and his supporters for what he described as inaccurate and ‘sexist’ attacks onHillary Clinton. ‘When you’re making a revolution you can’t be too careful with the facts,’ Mr. Clinton said … In a response, Tad Devine, a senior adviser to Mr. Sanders, called it ‘disappointing that President Clinton has decided to launch these attacks.'”

Bill Clinton knocks Sanders for Clinton-era derivatives deregulation. Politico: “…he brought up Sanders’ 2000 vote in favor of the commodities futures modernization act — a bill Clinton signed into law. ‘He voted for that bill,’ he said, ‘but you will never hear her say he is a tool of Wall Street because of it, because they made a mistake.'”

Hillary struggles to consolidate women’s vote. W. Post: “The latest sign came Sunday, when a new CNN-WMUR survey here showed Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont beating Clinton among women by eight percentage points … While many older women’s rights advocates see the election of Clinton as the next logical step in a broader movement, some younger activists have expressed resentment at the notion that they should feel obligated to vote for Clinton…”

Clinton goes off NH trail to visit Flint. NYT: “…speaking at a black church here on Sunday, [she] implored Congress to pass a bill that would deliver aid…”

Sanders outspending Clinton in NH. Politico: “On the heels of a record $20 million fundraising haul in January — $5 million more than Clinton, who was expected to set the pace — the Vermont senator has outspent her here by a margin of more than 3-to-1 in television ads.”

NH May Not Winnow GOP Field

No Republican shows momentum. W. Post: “Each of the top three finishers in Iowa — Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.), billionaire developer Donald Trump and Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) — will begin the final push here with important questions surrounding their candidacies. Trailing them are three governors whose campaigns have not lit up the GOP’s restless and disaffected grass roots.”

Rubio tripped up by caution. Politico: “…he’s also an fundamentally risk-averse politician who often seeks the safety of a script [as] the final debate before the primary here painfully revealed … the weak performance now raises the real possibility that New Hampshire will not narrow the establishment lane …”

Republicans stuck in a “time loop” says NYT’s Paul Krugman: “Mr. Rubio’s inability to do anything besides repeat canned talking points was startling … truth is that the whole G.O.P. seems stuck in a time loop, saying and doing the same things over and over … there’s the ritual denunciation of Obamacare as a terrible, very bad, no good, job-killing law … there’s the assertion that taxing the rich has terrible effects on economic growth … on foreign policy the required G.O.P. position has become one of utter confidence in the effectiveness of military force. How did that work in Iraq?”