Robert Borosage

Is Bernie Sanders the Ronald Reagan of 2016?

Is Senator Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) electable? As Sanders has surged in the polls, supporters of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton are issuing increasingly dire warnings about his general election prospects. On websites like Vox, many political scientists agree: He can’t win. Millions of dollars in Republican ads, they insist, will paint him a socialist or a red. Americans aren’t about to elect a Jewish socialist who still hasn’t lost his Brooklyn accent. It will be a debacle, critics predict, like Democratic Senator George McGovern’s crushing 1972 loss, when the Democrats lost 48 states, or Republican Senator Barry Goldwater, buried by President Lyndon B. Johnson’s stunning landslide in 1964. It will set progressives back for decades. Ironically, as Sanders rises in the polls and does better than expected, the alarms grow in volume and intensity.

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Robert Borosage

New Hampshire: Populist Uprising

“We have sent a message that will resound from Wall Street to Washington,“ presidential candidate Bernie Sanders exulted last night, after drubbing Hillary Clinton in the New Hampshire primary. On the Republican side, Donald Trump won convincingly as predicted. The revolt against the establishment of both parties was inescapable. Endorsements of party officials meant nothing. Trotting out 90-year-old Barbara Bush or the Big Dog, Bill Clinton, didn’t matter. Voters were sensible. Empty suits like Marco Rubio were punished with a fifth place showing. Chris Christie, Carly Fiorina and Ben Carson were retired. And their message was clear: they are sick and tired of being sick and tired. It is time for change. The Sanders Victory The scope of Sanders victory took virtually all observers by surprise. He trounced Clinton by more than 20 percentage points.

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Hedrick Smith

The Blowback Against ‘Gerrymandering On Steroids’

In a stunning defeat for what one judge called “gerrymandering on steroids,” a three-judge federal court has ruled that the Republican gerrymandering of North Carolina’s congressional districts in 2011 was unconstitutional on grounds that it was racially driven and illegally packed too many black voters into two districts. The court gave the legislature just two weeks to fix the problem. This decision is a striking echo of the rising call for political reforms from presidential candidates and popular movements across the country. It has already emboldened North Carolina reformers to push for more sweeping reforms. And if upheld, it could have a ripple effect in Virginia, Texas and Alabama, where similar lawsuits challenge so-called racial gerrymandering by Republican-led legislatures.

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Stephen Lerner

Clipping America’s Hedge Funds

The growing Hedge Clippers campaign is pioneering new strategies to prevent hedge funds from cashing in on corporate wage squeezes and benefit cuts. Hedge funds and their billionaire managers offer up a powerful symbol of the forces that are driving America’s political and economic inequality. Getting the names and faces of these hedge fund billionaires before the public can help us tell a vivid story of what’s gone wrong with our economy and our politics — and help us build a movement to slice away at that billionaire power. The “Hedge Clippers” campaign is doing plenty of that slicing. Begun in New York and now active in several other states, the effort is organizing at the state and federal levels around seemingly separate issues that range from school privatization and public sector cutbacks to environmental degradation and the ongoing assault on worker rights.

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Bill Scher

Jeb Bush Really Said This About Climate Change

Which presidential candidate said this? If we don’t adapt to the reality of a changing climate there could be serious repercussions … I think the climate is changing. It is inconceivable to me that 5 billion people living on this planet don’t have an impact on that — that man has some say in this. And that we should be planning over the long haul to deal with it. Bernie Sanders? Hillary Clinton? No, Jeb Bush! Notably, it was a response to a New Hampshire Republican who said, “I’m looking for a Republican to vote for … who is willing to take climate change in a serious manner and be forward-thinking on climate change.” Jeb Bush has said climate change is real before but often downplayed the urgency and offered no policy solutions.

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Leo Gerard

TPP Would Further Emasculate America

A century ago, Carl Sandburg dubbed Chicago the City of Big Shoulders: “hog butcher for the world, tool maker, stacker of wheat, player with railroads and the nation’s freight handler; stormy, husky brawling.” All of this was true of America itself as well: Nation of big shoulders. The United States was a brawny country that would intervene to help win World War I and later quickly retool factories to serve as munitions mills to win World War II.  Now, though, as America’s tool makers and freight car builders are furloughed, their factories shuttered and offshored, America is wasting. Ill-conceived free trade deals are reducing it to a nation of stooped shoulders. The newest proposed deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), signed in New Zealand last week by representatives of its 12 member states, would further enfeeble American manufacturing.

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Isaiah J. Poole

Why Hillary Clinton’s Five Words On Social Security Matter

As Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is being celebrated by progressive Social Security advocates for posting a statement on Twitter late Friday that “I won’t cut Social Security,” let’s not forget why it was important to get Clinton to go on the record with those five words – and why it is important to continue to press Clinton to underscore them as her campaign for the presidency continues. Her tweet was her most declarative statement to date on the issue of where she would stand on various proposals to “reform” Social Security and ensure its long-term solvency. It’s significant because in the minds of people concerned about what she would do as president when the future of Social Security is debated, she has some history to overcome – some of it very recent.

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Robert Reich

Why We Must Try

Instead of “Yes we can,” many Democrats have adopted a new slogan this election year: “We shouldn’t even try.” We shouldn’t try for single-payer system, they say. We’ll be lucky if we prevent Republicans from repealing Obamacare. We shouldn’t try for a $15 an hour minimum wage. The best we can do is $12 an hour. We shouldn’t try to restore the Glass-Steagall Act that used to separate investment and commercial banking, or bust up the biggest banks. We’ll be lucky to stop Republicans from repealing Dodd-Frank. We shouldn’t try for free public higher education. As it is, Republicans are out to cut all federal education spending. We shouldn’t try to tax carbon or speculative trades on Wall Street, or raise taxes on the wealthy. We’ll be fortunate to just maintain the taxes already in place. Most of all, we shouldn’t even try to get big money out of politics.

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Jim Hightower

Political Poison

One big difference between the rich and the poor in our country is that the rich don’t tend to have their drinking water poisoned by their own governor. Not that Republican Governor Rick Snyder personally dumped poison into Flint, Michigan’s water. But by dumping his small-minded, ideological, budget-whacking policies on the people of this largely poor community, he did, in fact, poison them. Worse, when Flint’s families complained that their tap water was oddly colored, nasty tasting, stinky, and causing rashes on their children, Snyder and his top officials denied there was a problem, even when residents showed jugs of the brownish liquid to them. It’s a myth, claimed the authorities, accusing locals of “trying to turn (the issue) into a political football” and asserting that the complainers were just being finicky about the aesthetics of their water.

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Dave Johnson

Is Clinton Bought By Wall Street? There Is A Test For That

Secretary Hillary Clinton has accepted millions in “speaking fees” and campaign contributions from interest groups – most notably Wall Street firms – that she will be in a position to help or hurt as president. She promises that the money will not influence her if she takes office, but voters are understandably skeptical. Voters have been betrayed again and again by people who have become known as “corporate Democrats.” These politicians made promises to help regular working people, then turned on them after elections and enacted policies that boost the monied interests – especially Wall Street and giant corporations – at the expense of the rest of the country.

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Richard Eskow

Inequality Against Democracy: 10 Facts About the 1 Percent

Economic inequality inspired Occupy Wall Street, a movement that in a few short months transformed our political discourse with the concept of the “1 percent” and the “99 percent.” Today the presidential candidacy of Bernie Sanders is altering the political landscape with a call to reduce inequality. Why does this theme resonate with so many voters? How does it intersect with other issues like social justice, national security and the environment? Is inequality irreversible? We are living through the greatest “wealth grab” in history. But inequality is not produced by immutable forces. It’s the result of a legislative agenda promoted by the rich and executed by their political allies. The struggle to change this agenda and end inequality is inseparable from the other critical struggles of our time.

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Terrance Heath

Wingnut Week In Review: Everybody Hates Ted

Meet Ted Cruz, the Republican winner of the Iowa caucuses. He’s a liar, a jerk, and nobody who knows him remotely well — including his fellow Republicans and, quite possibly, his own family — appears to like him much. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) barely had time to bask in his come-from-behind in Iowa caucuses before that victory was called into question. The Sunday before the Iowa Caucuses, Cruz’s campaign came under fire from Iowa’s Secretary of State, for sending out fraudulent mailers aiming to drive voters to the polls by claiming they had committed “violations.” On Wednesday, Brietbart News broke the story that Cruz’s campaign encouraged precinct chairs in Iowa to tell Ben Carson’s supporters that he was leaving the race and urge them to vote for Cruz.

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Dave Johnson

Enormous, Humongous December, And Record Yearly, Trade Deficit

The U.S. Census Bureau reported Friday that the December goods and services trade deficit was an enormous, humongous $43.4 billion. Imports were up, exports were down. The cause was a “stronger” dollar, decreased demand around the world thanks to “austerity” policies that take money out of economies, and, of course, our job-killing “free trade” policies. The 2015 goods and services deficit added up to $531.5 billion. This was $23.2 billion (4.6 percent) more than 2014. The goods and services trade deficit with China was a record $365.7 billion in 2015. That represents a billion dollars worth of jobs shipped to China every single day for a year. The total, the yearly 2015 goods deficit was $758.9 billion. (Services ran a surplus.) The 2015 trade deficit in manufacturing was $831.4 billion, a 13.2 percent increase from 2014.

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Isaiah J. Poole

Jobs Report: Unfinished Business As Unemployment Falls Below 5 Percent

The headlines being generated by Friday’s jobs report from the Labor Department – the unemployment rate falling below 5 percent for the first time since November 2007 – are a temptation to have policymakers and some politicians to pull their “Mission Accomplished” banners out of their closets. But this is still not the time to declare that the job market has healed from the damage done by the Great Recession and the anemic response that followed. There is a lot of talk that if the unemployment rate falls below 5 percent, we have reached “full employment,” and that economic policy needs to turn now to ensuring that the economy does not overheat and spark a surge of inflation.

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Robert Borosage

At The New Hampshire Democratic Presidential Debate, Populism Wins

The face-off between Senator Bernie Sanders and Secretary Hillary Clinton last night in New Hampshire highlighted the strengths and vulnerabilities of both. Both put in impressive, strong performances. Both got their message out. Voters are left to decide whom they choose to believe. Populism Wins The clear victor of the night was populism. Sanders, of course, drove that subject, with his core message of a rigged economy and a corrupted politics. Clinton chose once more to compete as a progressive populist, both rhetorically and with stronger rhetoric about breaking up banks, and taking on the drug and insurance companies. Populism sets the terms of the debate in the Democratic Party. Sanders champions it; Clinton has chosen to embrace it. It is amazing to watch a debate in which the two Democratic candidates argue about who is the real progressive.

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Terrance Heath

Ted Cruz Won The Iowa Caucuses. Here’s What He Wants To Do To America.

From the moment he launched his presidential bid, conventional wisdom said Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) wouldn’t even get close to becoming president. This week Cruz won the Iowa Caucuses, and got a little closer to the White House. Here’s why that should scare you. Image via Donkey Hotey @ Flickr. Cruz’s win surprised a lot of people, especially (former?) frontrunner Donald Trump. It’s tempting to breathe a sigh of relief, and count Cruz’s win as the beginning of the end of Trump’s candidacy. But let’s not kid ourselves. Cruz is every bit as bad as Trump — if not worse. Let’s take a moment to remember what Ted Cruz wants to do to America. Ted Cruz’s Agenda Health Care As a senator, Cruz has had a lot to say about the Affordable Care Act. He’s compared failing to fight the laws implementation to appeasing Adolf Hitler.

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Jeff Bryant

An Emerging New Narrative For Education

The big news about education policy in the presidential race is that there is no news. As Laura Moser writes for Slate, “None of the candidates are talking about education. Like, at all.” At Salon, parent and public school activist Bertis Downs argues that even the few times Democratic Party candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have mentioned education, their “words don’t seem to resonate with many of the largely untapped public education parents and teachers who are in search of a candidate.” (I’d submit the one candidate who has made education prominent in his campaign is Jeb Bush.

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Dave Johnson

Privatization Causes Poverty: Senate Cafeteria Workers’ Story Continues

Our government has been on a privatization binge for some time. Things that We the People used to just do federally or through state and local governments were closed down and private corporations were hired to do those things instead. This “saved money” because the well-paid public workers were laid off, losing their benefits and seniority, and new workers were hired at the lowest possible wages with few or no benefits. Of course, this “cost savings” meant that the tax base eroded, the old and replacement workers often had to go on public assistance, property values plunged as the homes of the old workers were foreclosed and the new workers couldn’t afford to buy, schools were strapped as more low-income kids came in, and all the other ways that the transition to a low-wage economy has ended up costing all of us. But who’s counting? U.S.

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Bill Scher

That Time Marco Rubio Tried To Accomplish Something

Today, Marco Rubio surrogate Rick Santorum was stumped when asked by MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough to name one Rubio accomplishment. Santorum pleaded that Rubio’s short time in the Senate was a period when “nothing got done” so of course he doesn’t have any accomplishments. He has a point. Rubio’s Senate career was solely when a Democrat was president, and Republicans were mostly trying to block his agenda. Similarly, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton didn’t have a lot of Senate accomplishments when George W. Bush was president. But for Rubio, pointing a finger at Obama doesn’t exonerate. Because there was one time when Rubio tried very hard to accomplishment something, even asserting a leadership role: immigration reform. Not only did he fail to accomplish enactment of the bill, his leadership was a colossal disaster.

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Dave Johnson

Sanders Vows To Kill TPP If Elected. Will Clinton?

As the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) “free-trade” agreement was signed in New Zealand by representatives of the 12 participating countries, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders strongly voiced his opposition and committed to doing what he can to kill the deal if he is elected president. Rival Hillary Clinton has also stated opposition to the TPP, but will she also vow to kill it if elected? Sanders Vows To Kill TPP Saying that TPP follows in the footsteps of failed trade agreements like NAFTA, CAFTA, and Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) with China, Sanders promised to “fundamentally rewrite our trade policies to benefit working families, not just the CEOs of large, multinational corporations.” He said that supporters of these agreements have sold them as creating jobs, but over and over again, they have been proven dead wrong.

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