State Of The Union 2006: By The Numbers

ON INCOMES:
–Inflation-adjusted average CEO pay at depth of recession in 2002: $7,773,000
–Average CEO pay as of 2004: $9,600,000
[Executive Pay, Business Week 4/21/2003; A Payday For Performance, Business Week 4/18/2005]

–Increase in productivity for 2005: +13.5 percent
–Percentage increase in average American CEO’s compensation since 2002: +24 percent
[Business Week, April 21, 2003; BLS, Labor Productivity and Costs]

–Inflation-adjusted median household income in 2000: $46,058
–Median household income in 2004: $44,389
[Historical Income Tables –Households, H-6 Table US Census]

–Decrease in median income from 2000-2004 in White households: $1,066
–Decrease in median income from 2000-2004 in Hispanic households: $2,141
–Decrease in median income from 2000-2004 in Black households: $2,407
[Historical Income Tables –Households, H-6 White, not Hispanic, Black, and Hispanic Tables, US Census]

ON JOBS:
–American manufacturing jobs in 2001: 17,101,000
–American manufacturing jobs in 2005: 14,283,000
[The Economic State Of The Union, Manufacturing & Technology News Jan. 19, 2006]

–Number of private sector jobs created since 2001 excluding those produced by increased military spending: -1,160,000
–Number of American manufacturing jobs lost since 2001: 2,818,000
[Economic Policy Institute, Sept. 3, 2005; Manufacturing & Technology News, Jan. 19, 2006]

–Average number of fewer hours per week parents have to spend with their kids today than 35 years ago: 22
–Percentage decrease in average American household income since 2000: -3 percent
[National Statistics, PBS— Hedrick Smith; US Census]

ON ENERGY:
–Average price of a gallon of gasoline in 2000: $1.51
–Average price of a gallon of gasoline in 2005: $2.28
[December 2005 Monthly Energy Review, Energy Information Administration, Dec. 22, 2005]

–Percentage increase in the price of a gallon of gasoline since 2000: +51 percent
–Percentage increase in the price of a gallon of home heating oil since 2000: +94 percent
[Energy Information Administration, Dec. 22, 2005; Energy Information Administration, Jan. 2006]

–Average price of a gallon of home heating oil, Winter of 1999-2000: $1.24
–Projected price of a gallon of home heating oil, Winter of 2005-2006: $2.41
[Selected U.S. Average Consumer: Table WF01, Energy Information Administration, Jan. 2006]

–Average increase in profits for oil companies in third quarter of 2005: +69 percent
–Amount of subsidies provided to oil industry in 2005 energy bill: $6 billion
[Star-Telegram, Oct. 26, 2005; Public Citizen Aug. 2005]

ON HEALTH CARE:
–Percentage of companies that provided health care to their employees in 2000: 69 percent
–Percentage of companies that provided health care to their employees in 2005: 60 percent
[The Kaiser Family Foundation, June 14, 2005]

–Number of Americans without health insurance in 2000: 39,800,000
–Number of Americans without health insurance as of 2004: 45,800,000
[U.S. Census Bureau, Sept. 30, 2002; U.S. Census Bureau Aug. 30, 2005.]

–Percentage of companies that provided healthcare insurance to their employees as of 2005: 60 percent
–Number of additional Americans without health insurance since 2000: 6,000,000
[The Kaiser Family Foundation, June 14, 2005; U.S. Census Bureau, Aug. 30, 2005]

ON COLLEGE COSTS:
–Average cost of yearly tuition at a 4-year public university in 2000: $7,020
–Average cost of yearly tuition at a 4-year public university in 2005: $10,982
[Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 27, 2000; The College Board, Oct.18, 2005]

–Average increase in yearly tuition costs for public university students since 2000: +$3,962
–Average loan burden a carried by student upon graduation as of 2003: $18,900
–Average increase families will pay in student loan interests due to Republican cuts in the 2006 education budget: $2,000 for students, $3,000 for parents
[Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 27, 2000; The College Board, Oct. 18, 2005; Nellie Mae Feb. 6, 2003; Wall Street Journal, Dec. 22, 2005]

ON RETIREMENT SECURITY:
–Americans working in private sector who can rely on a defined pension as of 2004: 6 percent
–Baby Boomers who believe they’re very prepared to meet living expenses of retirement as of 2005: 24 percent
[New York Times, Jan. 16, 2006; AllState, Oct. 4, 2005]

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