Los Angeles Goes to $15 Minimum Wage

The City of Angels is rising, voting to lift its minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. This is entirely a victory of the workers who led the fight and the community groups that joined the struggle.
Robert Borosage
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National Day of Action to Save the Postal Service

The security of workers in the U.S. Postal Service is being threatened, and that is why the American Postal Workers Union asked for support for protests in 85 cities across 42 states.
Emily Foster
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The Price We Pay For Conservative Scorn Of Amtrak

An Amtrak train derails on its way through Philadelphia. A House appropriations subcommittee votes to cut federal funding for Amtrak by about 20 percent. Two dots conservatives don't want you to connect.
Isaiah J. Poole
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You Don’t Have To Sell Your Soul To Pay For Infrastructure

Anti-government conservative ideologues and their big-business benefactors have an interest in convincing people that privatization, privatization-lite and breaks for tax evaders are the only options worth discussing.
Isaiah J. Poole
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For Infrastructure Week, A Progressive Call To Action

Progressive populists are going to have to get loud and get active – and this is a good week to do so. An adequately and honestly funded infrastructure plan is essential to a “jobs for all” agenda.
Isaiah J. Poole
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Jobs Report: We’re Still Feeling The Effects of Austerity

As has been true for the past few months, you have to get below the sunny top lines of the April jobs report to get the real story: We're still have a slack labor market, and right-wing austerity is the cause.
Isaiah J. Poole
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Andrew Cuomo Feels the Heat, Sees the Light

For evidence that movement matters, read the attached op-ed by Andrew Cuomo. The man who shot down New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's efforts to raise the minimum wage now champions fast food workers. Who knew?
Robert Borosage
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The Words of Dead Workers

On Workers’ Memorial Day, commemorating lives lost on the job, USW members will place spotlights on 35 crosses honoring workers killed at a Texas City refinery over 35 years, to highlight lives sacrificed when safety was compromised there.
Leo Gerard
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Government Sweatshops: A Time for the President to Act

The federal government is the leading generator of low-wage jobs in America. Now those workers are calling on the president to step up and use his pen to lift workers up, not drive them down.
Robert Borosage
  • 93

Government Contract Workers Strike For Better Pay

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Progressive Caucus members stand with low-wage government contract workers, saying that taxpayer-paid contractors should pay workers a living wage.
Miya Pontes
  • 8

Study: “Right-To-Work” Lowers Wages

A new reports confirms that "right-to-work" laws are really about employers' to "right" make their employees work for lower wages, and not about protecting workers rights.
Terrance Heath
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On Tax Day, The Fight for $15 Is Everyone’s Fight.

Today, in what’s being called the largest protest of its kind, thousands of low-wage workers, adjunct professors, elected officials, even CEOs are standing up for a livable wage and an economy that works for everyone.
Terrance Heath
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The “Fight for $15” and the Return of the Vanishing Worker

The “fight for $15” matters – because the lives of working people matter, and because the success of this effort would help strengthen the American economy. But the significance of April 15's action runs even deeper than that.
Richard Eskow
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Fast Track: Ohio Gets It. But Will Clinton?

Ohio gets it about "NAFTA-style" trade deals. Fast Track and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) are coming for the rest of Ohio's jobs and Ohio is fighting back. Will Hillary Clinton join the fight?

The End of the U.S. Boom

Economic analysts now say the economy isn't as strong as they thought. There never was much basis for claiming a boom in the U.S. economy and the people claiming otherwise were relying on a very selective reading of the data.
Dean Baker
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The Terrible Twos: Central Bank Inflation Targets

The March job numbers came in somewhat worse than most analysts had expected. Many are warning that the economy is weaker than they thought. These warnings are in fact good news. They may slow down the Fed's rush to raise interest rates.
Dean Baker
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The War Against Women Getting Paid Family Leave

A bill that would allow workers up to 12 weeks of paid leave for pregnancy, childbirth recovery and other health-related reasons is being opposed again by the usual suspects. Their arguments are increasingly impotent.
Meghan Byrd
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Indiana Toll Road: Privatization’s Highway to Hell

The Indiana Toll Road is an infinite loop through the neoliberal world order, the mirror of a recursive economy in which every step toward corporatization creates more hardship – which calls for more privatization.
Richard Eskow
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March Jobs Report: Nothing to Celebrate

The March jobs report disappointed. The economy slowed. Pundits will blame it on the weather. But one thing is clear: This is no time for the Fed to be thinking about stepping on the brakes. We're already going too slow.
Robert Borosage
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Bad Trade

Everyone who testified at a Congressional hearing on the state of steel fingered bad trade as the culprit in the current collapse. As it is now, trade rules require Americans to forfeit a pound of flesh before trade enforcement can occur.
Leo Gerard
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