Isaiah J. Poole

Beyond Ferguson: If You Want Our Vote, Mind The Black Wealth Gap

This past Sunday was declared “Freedom Sunday” by a coalition of civil rights and religious organizations to rally African Americans and others to register to vote. That’s all to the good, but Maya Rockeymoore, CEO of the Center for Global Policy Solutions, is concerned that the African-American community is being asked to register to vote without being given policies to vote for that will address the chronic and widening gap between black and white wealth. “To the extent to which you have people getting out the vote over and over again to elect people who are not responsive on the policy side, you will get that level of frustration and the sense that none of this matters,” she said in a video interview with OurFuture.org.

Continue Reading...
Robert Borosage

Campaign 2014: Will Democrats Get the Message?

As the election heads into its home stretch, regular people start to tune in. In contested states and districts, they have little choice, as their TV shows are overrun with campaign spots, almost all of them negative. Much of what we’ve heard about the election is now in question. Here’s a brief field guide to the coming weeks: Voters Aren’t Buying What Republicans are Selling This should be a Republican year. The incumbent party generally fares poorly in a bi-election in the sixth year of a presidency. The contested Senate seats are virtually all in red states that President Obama lost in 2012. The economy is still lousy, with nearly half of Americans thinking it is still in recession. Two-thirds of the country thinks we are on the wrong track. Obama’s approval numbers are in the pits.

Continue Reading...
Terrance Heath

Wingnut Week In Review: Return to the “Appalahchian Trail”

With one bizarre Facebook post Rep. Mark Sanford (R, SC) dis-engaged his “Appalachian Trail” “soulmate,” and went from being a comeback kid to being punchline, again. And that’s not even the crazy part. Dumping someone via Facebook isn’t new. Countless teenagers do it every day. It’s just not something you’d expect from a grown man. Then again, Mark Sanford doesn’t do the expected. Back in 2009, nobody expected then South Carolina governor Mark Sanford to go MIA for more than four days over Father’s Day weekend, leaving his hapless staff to tell the media that Sanford was “hiking the Appalachian Trail.” The Daily Show Get More: Daily Show Full Episodes,Indecision Political Humor,The Daily Show on Facebook No one expected one of the top 10 modern political sex scandals, or one of the longest, most painfully awkward press conferences ever.

Continue Reading...
Richard Eskow

“Think Locally, Act Globally”: 6 Takeaways From The Scotland Vote

Scotland’s independence vote has been cast, and its citizens chose overwhelmingly to remain part of Great Britain. But this historic vote should be studied by all those who want to affect political and economic change around the world, because there are important lessons to be learned. They include: 1. Strength and unity are needed to resist the growing power of large corporations. This is the point Robert Reich was making when he made the following Facebook comments about the upcoming Scottish vote: “The only real beneficiaries will be large global corporations. They’ll have more bargaining leverage over a separate Scotland.

Continue Reading...
Isaiah J. Poole

The GOP Social Security Deception Game Is On. Here’s How To Fight Back.

The Social Security deception game that Republican candidates have resorted to playing in recent election cycles is back. But, at a rally on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) showed how candidates and activists can defeat the gamesmanship and be true champions of strengthening Social Security. The deception game is showing up in ads such as one now being aired in New York’s 21st congressional district, in which Republican Elise M. Stefanik is running against Democrat Aaron G. Woolf for a seat being vacated by retiring Rep. Bill Owens. The ad claims that Wolff supports policies that would dramatically cut Social Security benefits, while Stefanik says that she is committed to policies that “protect and preserve Social Security.” The ad is blatantly false.

Continue Reading...
Bill Scher

Start Climate Summit Week Right: March.

The White House will be applying a “full-court press” on the climate during the United Nations Climate Summit next week. In addition to President Obama’s address to the summit, which will detail all that he is trying to accomplish by executive action, the Cabinet will be unleashed. The Treasury Secretary will speak to the Brookings Institute about how we can cap carbon and grow the economy. The Environmental Protection Agency will be meeting with corporate executives to win commitments to reduce emissions. The heads of Agriculture, Interior, Transportation and Office of Management and Budget all will be speaking on the importance of averting a climate crisis. All of this activity is to show the 120 nations attending the summit that the United States has stepped up, and now it’s the rest of the world’s turn. You can help send that message to the world.

Continue Reading...
Dave Johnson

Full Employment Is More Than Possible. It Is Essential.

Progressives have not only been able to beat back the D.C.-elite effort to cut Social Security, we put the idea of expanding Social Security on the table instead. We pushed LGBT rights and gay marriage and have won significant victories. Sunday’s Climate March will force climate onto the map. We got the discussion of income inequality going. We have achieved minimum wage increases and paid sick days in several cities and states. The National Labor Relations Board is functioning and we even saw labor-movement gains in the South this week. We have held back (so far) the drumbeat for big cuts in corporate taxes they’re calling “tax reform.” Now it’s time to put our demand for full employment policies on the table.

Continue Reading...
Jeff Bryant

What’s The Matter With Kansas Education Policy?

Since “The Wizard of Oz,” the term “we’re not in Kansas anymore” has been shorthand for saying we’ve changed the usual surroundings for a new, disorienting terrain. For school children who actually live in Kansas, that would likely be a relief. Since the nation’s Great Recession, public education in Kansas has seen state funding cut repeatedly since 2009. This has left students and teachers in that state bereft of what would normally be viewed as “the basics” by anyone who has a modicum of understanding of how to run an effective school system, with swelling class sizes and elimination of basic programs like art, music and athletics. Unfortunately, Kansas is not the only place in America where public school conditions are causing students to wish they could be transported to the yellow brick road.

Continue Reading...
Terrance Heath

Beyond Ferguson: Ending Racial Profiling In America

America must stop “following tragedy with embarrassment” and pass the End Racial Profiling Act, before the next city that’s “one dead black teenager away from burning to the ground” catches fire. “How many more Michael Browns will we have?” Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) asked at the “Ferguson and Beyond – Profiling in America” briefing on Tuesday morning. “How many more Trayvon Martins? We all know racial profiling is un-American and wrong. We also know that it is a waste of time and resources. We know it turns communities against law enforcement. But we also know it can be deadly, and therefore has to end,” Cardin said. (Full video of the briefing is available on YouTube.) The End Racial Profiling Act (ERPA), introduced by Sen.

Continue Reading...
Dave Johnson

Airline Workers Win Big In Union Vote — In The South!

Airlines have been notoriously following the typical American capitalist business model of (literally) squeezing the customer into smaller and more uncomfortable seats, literally starving their customers, extorting cash for a bit more comfort on long trips, charging more for less – and then, to top things off, adding hidden fees. They notoriously have also been squeezing their employees, downgrading working conditions, demanding givebacks and fighting unionization. The squeeze on employees is finally turning around. Passenger service agents at American Airlines on Tuesday voted to be represented by a union. The vote was described as “overwhelming,” with 86 percent voting in favor.

Continue Reading...
Richard Eskow

Want to Save the Planet? Flood Wall Street.

This is a critical week for the planet. A United Nations conference on the climate will be followed on Saturday by the People’s Climate March, which is expected to be the largest environmental march in history. But it would be a grave mistake, for the planet and for ourselves, to overlook another event that is to take place on Sunday. That’s when the Flood Wall Street rally will target the role of global capitalism in our environmental crisis. The profit economy is a root cause – make that the root cause – of climate change. Wall Street is, in a very real sense, the epicenter of our environmental crisis. To ignore that fact is to risk dooming our other climate efforts to failure, or to use them merely as palliatives for troubled consciences. There’s no other way to say this: Capitalism, as practiced on Wall Street today, is an existential threat to humanity.

Continue Reading...
Dean Baker

The Myth that Sold the Financial Bailout

Monday marked the sixth anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers. The investment bank’s bankruptcy accelerated the financial meltdown that began with the near collapse of the investment bank Bear Stearns in March 2008 (saved by the Federal Reserve and JPMorgan) and picked up steam with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac going under the week before Lehman’s demise. The day after Lehman failed, the giant insurer AIG was set to collapse, only to be rescued by the Fed. With the other Wall Street behemoths also on shaky ground, then–Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson ran to Capitol Hill, accompanied by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke and New York Fed President Timothy Geithner. Their message was clear: The apocalypse was nigh. They demanded Congress make an open-ended commitment to bail out the banks.

Continue Reading...
Emily Schwartz Greco

A Simpler Solution to Climate Change

Even if climate science is complicated, author Naomi Klein wants you to know that finding a solution to global warming is easy. In her powerful new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, the Canadian globalization expert drills through the noisy climate debate and finds that humanity has no choice but to ditch its fossil fuel-driven global economy for a local model powered by renewable energy. Out with oil, gas, and coal. In with wind, sun, small-scale hydro, and other things that don’t make the climate problem worse. Period. A Change in the Weather, an OtherWords cartoon by Khalil Bendib Throughout the book, Klein sticks to her promise to stay out of the scientific weeds.

Continue Reading...
Dave Johnson

Surprise! House Passes Revitalize American Manufacturing and Innovation

Monday the House of Representatives passed the Revitalize American Manufacturing and Innovation Act (H.R. 2996) (RAMI). The RAMI bill, part of House Democrats’ Make It In America jobs plan,  was sponsored by Representatives Tom Reed (R-NY) and Joseph Kennedy (D-MA) in August 2013. The bill had 50 Democrat and (remarkably) 50 Republican co-sponsors. The Senate version of RAMI, (S. 1468) was introduced at the same time by Senators Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Roy Blunt (R-MO). If the RAMI bill is not filibustered by Senate Republicans it will be signed by President Obama. RAMI will create a network of regional institutes across the country, along the lines of the “manufacturing hub” idea that the Obama administration has advocated. According to Rep.

Continue Reading...
Dave Johnson

Senate Republicans Filibuster Equal Pay For Women (Again)

Republicans in the Senate on Monday unanimously filibustered the Paycheck Fairness Act. Did you see this on the news? Did you hear about it on the radio? Did you read about it in your local paper? There is an election coming and accurate, objective information is essential for democracy to function. The Paycheck Fairness Act “amends the portion of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA) known as the Equal Pay Act to revise remedies for, enforcement of, and exceptions to prohibitions against sex discrimination in the payment of wages.” It “revises the exception to the prohibition for a wage rate differential based on any other factor other than sex. Limits such factors to bona fide factors, such as education, training, or experience.” To sum up, it would put in place measures to ensure that women will be paid the same as men if they do the same work.

Continue Reading...
Bill Scher

Capping Carbon Costs Nothing

The big climate news in advance of next week’s U.N. climate summit is a new global commission report that finds the investments needed to avert a climate crisis would likely not result in any net cost. According to the New York Times, “an ambitious series of measures to limit emissions would cost $4 trillion or so over the next 15 years” but that’s only “an increase of roughly 5 percent over the amount that would likely be spent anyway on new power plants, transit systems and other infrastructure.” More importantly: “When the secondary benefits of greener policies — like lower fuel costs, fewer premature deaths from air pollution and reduced medical bills — are taken into account, the changes might wind up saving money…” Shocking? Well, only if you haven’t been paying attention.

Continue Reading...
Terrance Heath

Young, Black, And Guilty Until Proven Innocent

The New York Times informed us that Michael Brown was “no angel.” When being young and black is to be guilty until proven innocent, black children must be “angelic” just to be worthy of living. The Times initially defended its “no angel” assessment of Michael Brown’s young life, which ran on the day of Brown’s funeral. National Editor Allison Mitchell said the description connected to the lead paragraph about a moment when Brown thought he saw an angel, and that the article would have been written the same way if it had been about a young white man in the same situation. The Times eventually apologized, but the article is typical of a media pattern of treating white suspects and killers better than black victims.

Continue Reading...
Leo Gerard

Senate Republicans Vote to Silence Working Americans

Senate Republicans voted unanimously last week for elections that are competitions of cash, with candidates who amass the most money empowered to shout down opponents. The GOP rejected elections that are contests of ideas won by candidates offering the best concepts. Forty-two Republican Senators on Thursday opposed advancing a proposed constitutional amendment called Democracy for All. It would have ended the one percent’s control over elections and politicians. It would have reversed the democracy-destroying Citizens United and McCutcheon decisions by permitting Congress and state legislatures to once again limit campaign spending. Republicans said no because they favor the system that indentures politicians to wealthy benefactors. As it stands now, corporations and billionaires may spend unbounded and unreported billions to buy elections.

Continue Reading...
Richard Eskow

The Middle Class and Working Poor’s Lifelong Losing Game, in 10 Slides

They say a picture’s worth a thousand words. If that’s true, the following ten images could provide the lyrics for a thousand blues songs. The graphs are taken from series of recent reports which, when considered together, create a paint-by-numbers picture of the lifelong losing game faced by working Americans. The chorus to our blues song goes like this: The middle the class and working poor are increasingly trapped in a cycle of economic decline, a downward slope which stretches from their golden youth to their sunset years. And there’s no way out, unless we find one for ourselves. Born Indebted It begins with the ever-growing mountain of debt which students must acquire in this society in order to receive a college education.

Continue Reading...
Dave Johnson

Corporate Courts — A Big Red Flag On “Trade” Agreements

Think about everything you understood about our system of government here in the United States. We’re  governed under a document that starts with the words, “We the People.” Right? When We the People agree that something should done to make our lives better, it’s supposed to get done. Right? You didn’t know it, but that whole system thing changed several years ago. Our government, in our name, signed a document that placed corporate profits above our own democracy. The “investor-state dispute settlements” chapter in NAFTA (and similar agreements) places corporate rights on above the rights of people and their governments.

Continue Reading...
1 2 3 420